Lions

Blog

At the OKC Zoo, Go Wild!

Category: Asian Elephants

Cornea as High as an Elephant's Eye: Asha Undergoes Successful Treatment for Ocular Issue

Late this summer, caretakers observed female Asian elephant Asha, 24, demonstrating a “squinty” eye. This is not a common behavior and was initially treated with topical medication by Zoo veterinary staff. When the issue didn’t resolve after the initial round of treatment, teams determined it was time for an examination by an ophthalmologist. When dealing with animal ocular issues like Asha’s, the Zoo consults Dr. Jonathan Pucket, a full-time veterinary... Read More
at Monday, January 6, 2020
Share |

TONS of Love: OKC Zoo Caretakers Share Favorite Elephant Memories

The OKC Zoo is celebrating  World Elephant Day  on Sunday, August 11, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Presented by Bob Moore Subaru, Zoo guests are invited come together for elephants and enjoy a day of fun and learning with games, crafts, bio-facts and other activities on-site at the Zoo’s Sanctuary Asia elephant habitat and entry plaza. For this special day, the elephant caretakers from Sanctuary Asia share their favorite memories about one of the Zoo's seven Asian elephants... Read More
at Tuesday, August 6, 2019
Share |

OKC Zoo Pioneers Elephant Stem Cell Treatment

The Oklahoma City Zoo continues to be a leader in the field of animal medicine, innovating a new stem cell-based treatment to improve blood flow and shorten recovery time. When geriatric elephant Bamboo, 53, experienced a minor tail wound, veterinary staff came together and made a plan to help accelerate healing. Tails have smaller blood vessels and take longer to heal, especially in older animals. The OKC Zoo veterinary team decided to launch a two-pronged treatment approach. First, the... Read More
at Wednesday, May 29, 2019
Share |

OKC Zoo Contributes to Deadly Elephant Virus Research, Treatment

This week would have marked Asian elephant Malee’s eighth birthday. She was the first elephant calf born at the Oklahoma City Zoo and Botanical Garden after many years of work and the completion of a new elephant habitat. Instead, it’s an opportunity to reflect on the progress being made against the virus that claimed her life in 2015 when she was only four years old. A lethal virus called EEHV (elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus) is causing the death of young elephants... Read More
at Tuesday, April 16, 2019
Share |

Search the site